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Anne Rieder has a master’s degree in Food Technology from the University of Hohenheim, Germany.

Her master thesis was on the effect of fermented and non-fermented barley on oat on dough rheology and bread quality.

She has a PhD in Nutrition from the University of Oslo, Norway on the topic of Dietary immune modulation – carbohydrate specific effects of cereal and yeast beta-glucans.

From 2013 Anne has been employed at Nofima first as a post doc and then as a researcher.

Her research has been mainly focused on different aspects of dietary fibers, including their incorporation into different food products and the impact of food processing on fiber related health effects with a special focus on cereal beta-glucans and the upper gastrointestinal tract.

The application of a human in vitro digestion model for evaluation of fiber solution properties during digestion, starch digestion kinetics and protein digestibility has a major role in her research.
Together with her colleagues and collaborators Anne seeks to link results from in vitro digestion to in vivo human data e.g. on glycaemic response to improve the mechanistic understanding of dietary fibers health effects and help develop in vitro models for prediction of health outcomes.

In recent years Anne has also been working with sustainable protein sources from plants, algae or rest raw materials, their application in foods and their role in protein nutrition with a special focus on in vitro protein digestibility.

In addition to her focus health aspects of food, Anne has retained her interest in food technology for example through work related to food texture and rheology.